• Discourage practices which lock in users to OEM products. This includes such practices as keeping design specifications unavailable (black box products, such as car control systems). Encourage open standards as in the USA.
  • Remove legislation that prevents reuse of components in new goods, where that component can be shown to be indistinguishable from new, and with producer warranty to match.
  • Remove legislation that prevents reuse of components in certain industrial applications  such as lifting and hoisting  where that component has a demonstrable safety-assured history.
  • Promote greater use of labelling for materials of construction and history. Establish advertisement and accounting channels for businesses with remanufacture elements.
  • Give tax credits for the purchasers of second-hand or remanufactured items.
  • Promote, at an international level, metrics which value resource effectiveness and efficiency as a total systems measure of activity.
  • Encourage durable build through compulsory extended warranty periods; links to capital relief for guaranteed life.
  • Give proper consideration for public purchasing of remanufactured goods, where standards are equivalent to as new, and prices lower; move to leasing, pay-per-use and part-exchange/upgrade contracts.
  • Remove barriers which would prevent the re-export of used goods, such as classified waste streams, to be remanufactured abroad, particularly if they could then be re-imported.
  • Demand longevity and design for remanufacture in public purchase.
  • Sponsor profile-raising events, public and industrial.
  • Pursue multilateral efforts to factor in externalities.